Wednesday, 28 June 2017

What to do in Keflavík? The town near Keflavík Airport

Keflavík is a small town in the west of Iceland, well known for hosting the country's international airport. With the neighbouring town of Njarðvík and the village of Hafnir, they form the municipality of Reykjanesbær, with a population of just over 15,000 inhabitants - it is Iceland's third largest urban concentration.

What to do in Keflavík? The town near Keflavík Airport

Keflavík began to grow in the 16th century as a fishing village, however, in the 1940’s, it became better known as an airbase, after the Americans built an international airport during the Second World War, which allowed the United States to control the North Atlantic air routes and to transport personnel, equipment and consumer goods.

The American forces left Icelandic soil in 1947 but returned in 1951 to become a NATO base. The base closed in 2006 and is now used by the Icelandic Coast Guard. The many buildings of the army have been transformed into different types of housing or workshops. More and more hotels are appearing in the region, there is a wide choice of hotels and guesthouses to choose from, if you need to spend the night before an early flight.

What to do in Keflavík? The town near Keflavík Airport

Keflavík is often referred to as the Northern Liverpool, because in the 1960s and 1970s the city was full of talented and successful Icelandic musicians. The Museum of Rock & Roll, which opened in 2014, is filled with trinkets and information about Icelandic artists, old and new, from the sequined costumes of Páll Óskar to the fetish objects of the Sugarcubes. There is a lot to discover about the Icelandic music scene. The museum provides a tablet so you can fully enjoy an interactive guided tour, while having the opportunity to listen to your favourite Icelandic artists - and discover new ones! Open daily from 11 am to 6 pm, admission costs 1500Kr (12 euros) and is free for children under 16 years of age.

What to do in Keflavík? The town near Keflavík Airport

The Viking world of "Vikingaheimar" introduces you to the heart of the Vikings. This museum, which opened in 2009, offers five exhibitions on various themes related to the Vikings and the history of Iceland. The biggest attraction of the museum is the replica of a Viking ship from the 9th century, which was manufactured by shipbuilder Gunnar Marel Eggertson. He also travelled to New York on this boat in the year 2000 to celebrate the 1000 years of Leifur Eiríksson's journey from Europe to America. Outside the museum, you can find a few animals and small peat houses. From the 1st of February to the 31st of October, Vikingaheimar is open daily from 7 am to 6 pm and from 10 am to 5 pm from the 1st of November to the 31st of January. Also, note that the museum closes for the Christmas holidays between the 12th of December and the 7th of January. Entry costs 1500Kr (12 euros), 1300Kr (10 euros) for students and is free for children under the age of 14.

What to do in Keflavík? The town near Keflavík Airport

Keflavik also has a well-stocked library in Icelandic and English. The city is full of restaurants, shops, hotels and guesthouses. It is close to the famous Blue Lagoon and the Reykjanes Peninsula, which you can visit on your way to the airport for your departure.

What to do in Keflavík? The town near Keflavík Airport

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Monday, 26 June 2017

What to see in Eastern Iceland?

Egilsstaðir is the largest city in eastern Iceland, which lies on the banks of the river Lagarfljot. There are fabulous landscapes to discover and many cultural events to enjoy. The area surrounding Egilsstaðir Is magnificent with many mountains but also several forests, although these are rather rare in Iceland. The flora and fauna are varied, and you may be lucky enough to see wild reindeer, which are only found in this part of the country.

What to see in Eastern Iceland?

Selskógur is a forest, near the river Eyvindara, which has many marked trails for those who like short or long walks. You can also picnic there, go there to run, play with your children or whatever ... The forest of Hallormsstaður is the largest in Iceland, and covers almost 740 hectares. It is also a popular hiking spot and you can find more than 80 species of trees. There are two campsites available in the area: Atlavík or Höfðavík.

What to see in Eastern Iceland?

The cascade of Hengifoss is one of the highest and most beautiful waterfalls in Iceland and probably one of the most famous sites. It is 128 meters in height and is made up of several layers of rock. To view it you can follow a path that starts from the parking lot, or choose to follow the river if you are traveling in summer.

What to see in Eastern Iceland?

To the west of the Dyrfjöll Mountains, the site of Stóruð is reachable on foot after a 2 or 3-hour walk, starting from the neck in Vatnsskarð Borgarfjördur. It is an exceptional place where huge rocks form an impressive field, which becomes green and lush in the summer time.

The Sænautasel farm, near Jökuldalsheiði, was inhabited until 1880, but had to be abandoned following heavy ash fall from the volcano Askja, in the eruption of 1875. Halldór Laxness is said to have used this farm as inspiration for his novel "Independent People". Today, it is possible to visit the farm during the summer.

What to see in Eastern Iceland?

Skriðuklaustur is a mansion in the Fljótsdalur Valley, which also contains ruins of a sixteenth century monastery. In 1939, the writer Gunnar Gunnarsson (1889 - 1975) moved from Denmark to Skriðklaustur and built a large house there per the plans of the German architect Fritz Höger. Gunnarsson moved to Reykjavík in 1948 and gave Skriðklaustur to the Icelandic nation as a gift. Today it is a cultural centre open to the public.

What to see in Eastern Iceland?

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Thursday, 22 June 2017

4 Icelandic novels to read while visiting Iceland! - Icelandic books

Here you are a list of 4 interesting novels to help you get to know the icelandic culture!

4 Icelandic novels to read while visiting Iceland! - Icelandic books

Sjálfstætt fólk 
Independent People 
Halldór Laxness, 1934

Independent people is an epic novel by the famous Halldór Laxness, that received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1955. The region of Vopnafjörður, in northeast Iceland, powerfully inspires this book about rural Icelandic life in the early twentieth century.

The story tells the adventures of Bjartur, a stubborn farmer with fixed ideas, who lives a modest life in an isolated location in Iceland, with his family. Bjartur, a former servant, stands up for his rights against others to gain independence, which he considers the most fundamental human right than anything else in the world. Laxness had passionate notions about independence and freedom, so dear to the Icelandic nation today, and displays in his novel the impact this passion can have on an individual and his family. Independent People is a criticism of materialism and the already rampant capitalism in Iceland in the early twentieth century; the novel is as dark as a winter's evening in the north of Iceland with beams of sunshine here and there.

4 Icelandic novels to read while visiting Iceland! - Icelandic books

Furdustrandir 
Strange Shores 
Arnaldur Indridason, 2010

Detective Erlendur takes us on a journey to the east of Iceland, traveling amongst the landscapes of his childhood. In this fourteenth novel that narrates his adventures, Erlendur leaves his Reykjavík apartment and goes East, to investigate a young woman's disappearance in a storm. While there, his investigation stirs the ghosts of his past. Returning to the Eastfjords to his family home, Bakkasel at Eskifjördur, he plunges into a moment in his life that has haunted him continuously. Years before, Erlendur and his brother Bergur got lost in the mountains during a snowstorm while helping their father gather sheep. Erlendur was found safe and sound, but he never knew what happened to his brother Bergur. In Strange Shores, while investigating the trail of the young woman´s disappearance, he takes a detour into his past.

4 Icelandic novels to read while visiting Iceland! - Icelandic books

The Promise of Iceland 
The Promise of Iceland 
Kári Gíslason, 2011

This novel tells the story of Kári Gíslason, who returns to Iceland in 1990 to meet his father, whom he heard about, but was never in contact with him.

Born of an extramarital affair between a British mother and an Icelandic father, Kári Gíslason decides, twenty-seven years after his birth, to break a promise he made to his parents. The promise was not to reveal his father's identity, a respected married man owner of an Icelandic company and has five children. Kári wishes to contact his half-brothers and sisters who are not aware he exists.

This biographical novel takes us to Bessastaðir and Thingvellir, and through Reykjavik in the 1970s and intermingles with personal and family anecdotes. Set between Great Britain, Australia, and Iceland, the book leads us to reflect on memory, family, uprooting, identity and what we call "home." A delightful discovery.

4 Icelandic novels to read while visiting Iceland! - Icelandic books

Gísli á Uppsölum 
Gísli á Uppsölum 
Ingibjörg Reynisdóttir 2012

Gísli Gíslason Oktavius, known as Gísli of Uppsala, was born October 29, 1907, on a farm in Sélardal in the fjord Arnarfjörður, in the Westfjords of Iceland, where he lived until his died on 31 December 1986.

His father died in 1916, and Gísli remained on the farm with his three brothers and his mother, who died in 1950. As a young boy, Gísli did not like school and quickly looked at the outside world as a hostile and unpleasant place. He lost contact with his brothers when they left the farm, but their children sometimes came to visit, as well as other family members. Gísli loved reading and learned music (he played the organ) and to speak German. He wrote poetry and was a member of the Literary Society of Iceland.

4 Icelandic novels to read while visiting Iceland! - Icelandic books

Gísli lived alone with his animals, his music, his books, and his poetry. The journalist Ómar Ragnarsson made a short documentary about the life of this bachelor, living in solitude and simplicity, in the depths of an Icelandic fjord. Ingibjörg Reynisdóttir was inspired by all these sources to write a delightful book, and that rings true.

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Tuesday, 20 June 2017

Renting an apartment in Iceland - Accommodation in Iceland

Since the financial crisis of 2008, and the growth of tourism inIceland - that has transformed many of the buildings in the main centres into hotels and short let apartments - it is difficult - and expensive to rent an apartment in the country, especially in the capital Reykjavík.

Renting an apartment in Iceland - Accommodation in Iceland

Most Icelanders are owners. Only 20% of homes in Iceland are rented. Word of mouth is definitely the best way to find accommodation - as with many things in Iceland. Be sure to circulate the information to your contacts in Iceland, you will have more chance of finding an apartment

To give you an idea of the prices, a room in an apartment in Reykjavík city center will cost between 60,000 and 90,000 ISK (between 500 and 700 euros), a large apartment with a room 180,000 ISK (1500 euros) and At least ISK 260,000 (2100 euros) for a two bedroom apartment. If you move further outside the city centre, the prices aren't much cheaper, but the apartments are generally a bit larger.

Renting an apartment in Iceland - Accommodation in Iceland

In Akureyri, the second city of Iceland, a studio will cost about 80,000 ISK (650 euros) and an apartment with two rooms at least 140,000 ISK (1100 euros). Prices are high in Iceland; If you have signed a contract of at least six months, you may well be entitled to housing assistance. Go to your town hall every year to renew the request for help.

There are two main websites through which you can find classifieds for accommodation, but they are in Icelandic: leiga.is and leigulistinn.is. The latter requests a small contribution to have access to the contact details of the owners. You can also find some ads on the websites mbl.is, visir.is and bland.is, under the category "Húsnaedi í bodi".

Renting an apartment in Iceland - Accommodation in Iceland

If you are looking for accommodation in a small town, some websites in the Icelandic municipalities have a vacancy section. Til Leigu Úti Á Landi (rental in all of Iceland), Íbúðir á ÖLLU Norðurlandi (for rent in northern Iceland), Leiga (For rent in the north of Iceland) are Facebook groups where you can search for accommodation. For rent in Iceland (Til leigu in Íslandi), Leiguíbúðir in Norðurlandi,

Renting an apartment in Iceland - Accommodation in Iceland

You can also peel the ads from local newspapers, hang your apartment request on a flipchart in the lobby of a university or other public buildings for example. Make sure you have accommodation for the first few weeks / months when you arrive in Iceland, then do your research on the spot. Talk about your apartment search to everyone you meet ... and be patient!

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Wednesday, 14 June 2017

A weekend in the North of Iceland!

Arriving: Friday afternoon
Departing: Monday morning

Friday:

Take a domestic flight to Akureyri from the airport in Reykjavik. Visit the small town centre, Listagilið, the arts district, the Akureyri church and the listagarðurinn botanical garden, where you can admire hundreds of plants and flowers. A little dip in the town’s swimming pool (a delight!) is essential. In the evening time, try out one of the restaurants or cosy cafes the town has to offer.

A weekend in the North of Iceland

Saturday:

The next day, rent a car and drive east to Mývatn. Half way, stop to admire the magnificent waterfall, Godafoss, then continue to Skútustaðir, which will be your first stop in the lake area where you can admire the pseudo-craters. Take some time to enjoy the green paradise of Höfði, there are paths around the peninsula and from the furthest point of Höfði you will see the most beautiful lava pillars in Mývatn - the lava pillars of Kálfastrandavogar.

Dimmuborgir is the next stop, and probably one of the most impressive attractions; The volcanic formations have been transformed into sculptures and you can walk through this lava field which is more than 2300 years old. A few kilometres north you will discover the crater Hverfjall or Hverfell, where a path will lead you to the top of the crater; The view is impregnable. You can enjoy a swim in the lagoon at Jardbodin. Eat and spend the night in the area.

A weekend in the North of Iceland

Sunday:

Get ready to go to the bubbling site Hverir Namafjall Krafla. From there, take a detour and head east to the intersection that will take you to Dettifoss, the most powerful waterfall in Europe. Go back and follow the western shore of the lake; if you like take a hike up the 529 metres high Vindbelgjarfjall mountain. If you are interested, check out the bird museum Fuglasafn Sigurgeirs, which is near a place called Ytri-Neslönd. Then, head back to Akureyri again, return your rental car and catch a flight to the Icelandic capital, Reykjavík, where you can spend a pleasant evening relaxing or partying.

A weekend in the North of Iceland

Monday:

If your flight is not very early in the morning, you may have time to enjoy the city or relax in the Blue Lagoon, in its water of 40 degrees.

A weekend in the North of Iceland

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Monday, 12 June 2017

Baby car seat. The Law in Iceland

Child in the car? The law and common sense require all children below 150cm height to travel in car seats. In case of sudden braking or other dynamic manoeuvre a small child without child restrain is defenceless. There is no doubt about the necessity of a safety seat. Choosing and assembling the right models is a bigger problem. To make it easy we will provide you with a handful of concretes.

A well- fitted car sear is an absolute must! Even if that is in someone else’s car like taxi. Even if we only go to the neighbouring intersection or to a nearby shop, even when we think that nothing bad can happen. Holding a child by an adult has no safeguard at all. During the emergency stop, it is impossible to hold the baby as at that moment it weighs more than 90kg.

Now, how we choose the right one? We adjust the car seat to the age and size of the child. Car seats are available in several weight categories.

Cat. 0 and 0+. Newborns and infants are assigned Cat. 0 (0-10kg, up to 9 months) and Cat. 0+ (0-13kg, up to 18 months)

The safest way is to place the car seat in the opposite direction to the car ride. This is recommendable till the child is 3 years old only. Here we can find seats with ISOFIX system as well. Here we must take into account not only the baby’s weight but also whether not not his or her head is protected. The baby’s head can’t protrude over the back of the restraint.

Baby car seat. The Law in Iceland

Cat. 1. For children aged from 9 months to 3-4 years its Cat. 1 (9-18kg)

When a child will grow out the seat for infant, we will need another seat which is designed for children up to 18kg. In this type of seats, the child is secured with a 5- point safety seat belt.

Cat. 1 (9-18 kg, 9 months to 3-4 years) and Cat. 2 (15-25kg) 3-4 to 6-7 years

When the child reaches 18kg or more, we should already use the sear with backrest. On the back there are holes through which the safety belt is inserted in a way that it is laid on the child’s baby and do not change the position during the ride. In these seats the backrest cannot be conducted below the line of sight of the child.

Baby car seat. The Law in Iceland

Cat. 2 (15-25 kg, from 3-4 to 6-7 years) and Category 3 (22-36kg) is for children age 6-7 to 10-12 years.

The booster seats are recommended only when the child reaches at least 135cm in height. Than we can use a 3-point seat belt and it is safer if we use the booster seat at the rear seat.

Baby car seat. The Law in Iceland

We can only give up completely with the child seat if the seat belt lies across the shoulder and thigh. In other way if it runs across the belly or laid on the neck, the child will still need a booster seat.

It is crucial to select the child seat carefully not guided by its exterior design but by the results of the tests which car seats are subjected to. The vitality of children’s car seats is 10 years and 5 years for infants. When buying a second hand car seat, we must check in case of any damages or destructions.

If your car is equipped with the ISOFIX system, it is a good idea to choose a car seat that fits it. ISOFIX allows for a much safer installation of a cars seat. It allows for a tight integration with the vehicle. If it goes about the seat belts, there might always be some backlash that make the child is less protected.

Baby car seat. The Law in Iceland

The safest place to carry the child is at the rear middle seat. Even though the law permits to carry children in the front seat, we do not recommend it. If we already decide to do that, we need to remember that it is only possible when the air bag is turned off.

Source: Icelandic Transport Authority

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Thursday, 8 June 2017

Iceland for hipsters. Visit Stöðvarfjörður and Mjóifjörður!

Stöðvarfjörður located 630 kilometers from the capital of Iceland, Reykjavik, has approx 200 residents. If you leave Reykjavik, take the road number 1 and then after the village of Breiðdalsvík take Route 96: you will arrive at the heart of the East Fjords. Get to know the hipster side of Iceand!

Iceland for hipsters. Visit Stöðvarfjörður and Mjóifjörður!

Stöðvarfjörður is a small village at the foot of the 850 meters high mountain Hellufjall. Once upon a time, Stödvarfjörður was an important place for fishing, and now the town has been transformed into a home for travellers and artists - one local fish factory (2800 square meters) is now an art and culture centre. International artists gather there throughout the year to create events and to exhibit their artwork.

For all you outdoor lovers, a refreshing walk around Jafnadalur valley is splendid. There you will find an enjoyable three-hour walk from Stöðvarfjörður to the rock of Einbúi (meaning hermit) a massive and solitary rock in otherwise flat surroundings. Closer to Stöðvarfjörður, just outside of the farm Lönd, there is another rock formation called Saxa, "chopper". Saxa is a "perforated" rock through which the sea and the waves squirt through, resembling the movement of a geyser - a Saxa is often called "geyser of the sea." Behind the village Stöðvarfjörður is the mountain Steðji, on the side of this characteristic mountain is Stórkerald, which is an unusual large ravine. Besides being a landmark for locals, the ravine holds many stories; it was the place of refuge for the Icelandic defending their property against Turkish pirates in the 1700s.

Iceland for hipsters. Visit Stöðvarfjörður and Mjóifjörður!

The small village of Brekkuþorp, more commonly called Mjóifjörður, has about 30 inhabitants. The passengers on the ferry Norrönna can expect a sailing time of 40 minutes to Mjóifjörður village. If you arrive by car from Akureyri, follow the road number 1, then Route 92 and then Route 953 until you reach Mjóifjörður. This road is only open in the summertime, and you can also take the boat that links Mjóifjörður and Neskaupstaður. When you arrive by car, you can admire the magnificent waterfall Klifbrekkufossar. Mjoeyri beach is known to be the last place of execution in Iceland. On September 30th, 1786, Eiríkur Thorlaksson was executed there for robbery and for the murder of three men; his body is buried near the Mjoeyri beach, an information sheet will guide you at this historical site.

Iceland for hipsters. Visit Stöðvarfjörður and Mjóifjörður!

On the south coast of Mjóifjörður, (a 30-minute walk) you’ll find yourself at Asknes Point where you can see the remains of a whaling station built by the Norwegians in 1900. At that time, nearly 200 people were employed there and lived; today only a ruin remains.

At the end of the fjord Mjóifjörður, you will find a unique destination, Dalatangi. When it is impossible to go further east by car, walk to the end of the road and then up to the rocks where you will find Dalatangi. It will seem like reaching the end of the earth, the view is breathtaking, and you will also see two lighthouses at Dalatangi; the oldest lighthouse made of basalt and was built in 1895; the second lighthouse was built in 1908 and is still active today.

Iceland for hipsters. Visit Stöðvarfjörður and Mjóifjörður!

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Tuesday, 6 June 2017

Jobs in Iceland - How to find a job in Iceland? (2017)

Iceland has one of the lowest unemployment rates in Europe with less than 3% at the end of 2016. Since the end of the 20th century the economy has flourished on the island, in particular the construction sector which provides many jobs for Icelanders and also allows many foreign workers to take advantage of the opportunities offered by the Icelandic labor market. The huge growth in tourism in recent years has also created a lot of employment opportunity, both temporary and permanent.

Jobs in Iceland - How to find a job in Iceland? (2017)

The structure of work in Iceland

Icelanders often have multiple jobs. A full-time job represents about 40 hours of work per week; Beyond 173 hours per month, your employer must pay you overtime.

Office hours are from 8 am to 4 pm - which is also the opening hours of most Icelandic administrations, banks and nursery schools. However, for those who do not speak Icelandic, it is difficult to find a job in an institution or an office, unless you have a very specific qualification.

Jobs in Iceland - How to find a job in Iceland? (2017)

Jobs in tourism and hotels are the easiest to find, especially in summer when the tourist season is in full swing: museum guide, tourist office worker, reservations manager, receptionist, waiting and bar staff, night watchman, etc. Many tourist enterprises operate on the 2-2-3 system, ie one week with two working days, two days off, three working days, and the following week two days off, two days of work and again three days off. The system is used with the standard eight hour working day but also often with 12 working days.

Finding a job in Iceland

The steps to find a job in Iceland are generally much less formal than in France, for example. Spontaneously presenting yourself with a resume in a company is often the best way to find a job. Doing your job search from abroad is often not very successful, as Icelanders rarely reply to letters or emails sent to them. A visit (or several) in person is a much more effective way to find a job.

Jobs in Iceland - How to find a job in Iceland? (2017)

If you already work in Iceland or know people on site, do not hesitate to give their name as a reference. In this small country, we like to know who we are working with and your potential employer will be reassured if he knows that one of his colleagues recommends you.

To find a job in Iceland, some sites may be useful. The EURES website identifies the jobs available across the country and puts the ads in English first, which means jobs are open to foreigners. When the list goes to Icelandic, these are announcements from the Icelandic ANPE, VMST. This site is rarely provided outside the Icelandic capital, as Icelandic employers use other recruitment strategies, but you can go to one of their offices and send them your CV. They are in contact with potential employers to whom they could pass on.

Jobs in Iceland - How to find a job in Iceland? (2017)

Visir.is and Morgunblaðið, both have a classified ads section. The first is the site of the daily Frettablaðið, which, every Saturday, devotes tens of pages to employment.

Reykjavik.is and Akureyri.is will give you access to the announcement of Icelandic municipalities with examples such as assistant cook in a school, assistant in a nursing home or ski lift operator in winter.

Jobs in Iceland - How to find a job in Iceland? (2017)

If you have a special degree or are looking for a job in Iceland, you will not necessarily need to speak Icelandic to be hired; Specialist doctors are in high demand, especially outside the capital. If you have a PhD, a research or teaching position may be available; Please contact the universities for more information (or better: visit the University of Iceland, University of Reykjavik, University of Bifröst, Hólar University, University of Western Fjords, Akureyri University) .

Jobs in Iceland - How to find a job in Iceland? (2017)

For jobs in tourism, you do not necessarily need to have experience or a diploma in this field. It is mainly your motivation and your skills that will be valued - especially your language skills. English, French, German and Spanish are assets to work in Iceland. Guesthouses and farms easily hire in the summer, and it is also possible to work at picking or producing fruit and vegetables in one of the many greenhouses of the country.

Jobs in Iceland - How to find a job in Iceland? (2017)

Your motivation and your will are your greatest assets - your CV and experience are often relegated to second place. Finding a job by going "door-to-door" will give you the greatest chance of success.

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Sunday, 4 June 2017

Where to dump RV waste water in Iceland? - Camping in Iceland

If you have already decided to rent a motorhome for your Icelandic trip, this article is a must read for you. We will talk about where to dump the waste waters and refill the fresh water tanks, and also what to expect from petrol stations in Iceland. Camping services will also be commented… as I said, do not miss this post!

Where to dump RV waste water in Iceland? - Camping in Iceland

Let’s start with the petrol stations. This is the easiest option to get your tanks ready, but always remember that fuel stations in Iceland can be far away from each other, a distance about 70-100 km between stations is not rare, so always make sure you have at least half tank of gas. The following stations in Reykjavík and Keflavík offer this service:

REYKJAVÍK

Olís Álfheimar. Suðurlandsbraut 49 - 108 Reykjavík

Olís Háaleiti. Háaleitisbraut, 12, 108 Reykjavík

KEFLAVÍK

Olís Básinn. Vatnsvegi, 16, 230 Reykjanesbær

ÓB Reykjanesbær. Fitjabraut 2-4, 260 Reykjanesbær

Where to dump RV waste water in Iceland? - Camping in Iceland

There are some companies that offer full service in some of the stations as N1, Skeljungur and Olís. They usually also have groceries, cafeteria or restaurant and most important: clean restrooms. Olís for example offers free WiFi and free coffee and have many stations with services as car wash area, portable toilet drain or public WC. You can check the different stations and services on this interactive map.

Some gas companies decide to low the price in a selected station to promote their low prices, but as we explained, you will have to refill the tank wherever you need it, there is no point to look for the bargain. However Icelandic gas companies are quite competitive and you will not find big price differences between stations. You can check prices in different areas and companies here.

There is a sign that you will have to remember during for trip. It’s the signal that informs about lavatory disposal facilities. Here is a complete map from the Environmental Agency of Iceland with all the authorised lavatory disposals on the island: http://www.ust.is/library/Skrar/Kort/kort-seyrulosun.html

Where to dump RV waste water in Iceland? - Camping in Iceland

We will talk about campsites now. When looking at where to dump waste water tanks, it’s important to know that many campsites have a dump station and offer facilities to refill the tanks with fresh water again, but nothing is for granted. Make sure you plan ahead and check about the services offered by the campsites you plan to stay. Many campsites have a web or at least an email address where you can get information in advance. A search engine might be useful in these cases, as it will show you the campsites available for your dates and you can also search by services offered. This link might be useful for you. Tip: if you are planning to do the Ring Road, there is a campsite just when you get to Höfn http://www.campsite.is/ where you can dump the waste tanks and refill with fresh water, even if you will not be staying overnight.

Where to dump RV waste water in Iceland? - Camping in Iceland

If looking for a camping in Reykjavik in particular where to empty your grey waters before returning your motorhome, you can do it at the Reykjavík campsite, in Sundlaugavegur 32, Reykjavík.

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