Monday, 29 May 2017

Volunteering in Iceland. Where to apply?

If you are looking for an adventure and a fulfilling experience abroad, volunteering can be a good idea. More and more Icelandic companies, especially in the field of tourism, are calling for volunteers. However, learn about your hosts and what they expect from you.

Volunteering in Iceland. Where to apply?

In some situations, the role of volunteers is a bit too much like that of employees, and sometimes the position is abused. Inquire about your work days and schedules - The legislation does not allow volunteers to work full days of work even in exchange for bed and board.

Think twice about whether you are willing to volunteer in Iceland. Unless you want to improve yourself in a particular professional area that justifies your volunteer position in the likes of a café or a tourism company, there are better opportunities for volunteering that will bring you closer to a true Icelandic experience.

Volunteering in Iceland. Where to apply?

In exchange for a small financial contribution, the agency Ninukot looks after you to find a family in which you can be an au pair, or find you a position on a farm. The advantage of going through this agency is that it has precise rules regarding the number of working hours, wages and other working conditions.

Wwoofing is not very popular in Iceland; There are only three ads in Iceland on their site, but you can publish an ad on the Bændablaðið (farmers' newspaper), or look for ads on the social networks of groups that offer an experience in an Icelandic family or on a farm.

Volunteering in Iceland. Where to apply?

The Polar Fox Centre, located in Súðavík in the Westfjords, hires volunteers every year to discover the world of Icelandic polar foxes - a good way to learn more about these creatures.

SEEDS is a non-governmental organization that offers various volunteer opportunities in Iceland; Cleaning up the western fjords' beaches, repairing hiking trail signs, participating in the reforestation effort, renovating monuments, etc., are examples of activities offered by SEEDS. With them you can be a volunteer for anything from 3 weeks up to a year; The projects are wide ranging and take place throughout Iceland.

Volunteering in Iceland. Where to apply?

Other opportunities include: working in the Skaftafell National Park, helping to build a barn and helping on a farm during the lambing period in May.

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Sunday, 28 May 2017

8 Most dangerous sites in Iceland. Tips to stay safe in Iceland!

The Ministry of Industry and Innovation, who are responsible for tourism, has compile a list of the most dangerous 24 sites in Iceland. Have a look at the link to read the Part I.


8 Most dangerous sites in Iceland. Tips to stay safe in Iceland!

Gullfoss

Gullfoss, the golden waterfall, is undoubtedly the most famous waterfall in Iceland. Located on the famous Golden Circle, along with Geysir and the Thingvellir National Park, it is a must see when visiting the south of Iceland. Gullfoss waterfall is 32 meters high, but its surrounding canyon reaches 70 meters high. At Gullfoss, some trails don't include chains and barriers preventing access to the most dangerous places near the waterfall. Observe its beauty from a safe distance and try not to get too close! In winter, the road to the waterfall is especially hazardous and slippery.


8 Most dangerous sites in Iceland. Tips to stay safe in Iceland!

Gunnuhver

Gunnuhver, on the Reykjanes peninsula, is a geothermal site known for its muddy broth. It is a beautiful and amazing place, but again, beware of temperatures that can reach over 300 degrees Celcius! Follow the paths and barriers. It happened that Gunnuhver had to be closed by local police when hot mud propelled several meters high into the air.


8 Most dangerous sites in Iceland. Tips to stay safe in Iceland!

Fjaðrárgljúfur

Fjaðrárgljúfur is an enormous and magnificent canyon, two kilometers long and one hundred meters deep. The surroundings of the canyon can be steep and narrow, and you have to be especially careful in this area.

Jökulsárlón

Jökulsárlón is a glacial lake located in the south of Iceland, near the Vatnajökull National Park. It is a highly popular place, with incredible colours, and also because of the icebergs floating on the lake. Recently, travellers put themselves in grave danger by jumping on icebergs and floating off on the ice. It might seem like an obvious precaution to everyone, but please, do not venture out on the ice or in the water!


8 Most dangerous sites in Iceland. Tips to stay safe in Iceland!

Ketubjörg

Ketubjörg waterfall is on the west side of the fjord Skagafjörður in northern Iceland. Nearly 120 meters high, the waterfall, is impressive, but the rock shape is steep and dangerous. On the ground in many places cracks began to form, and increases the risk of landslides. We recommend you take the utmost caution!

Kolugljúfur

In the south of the peninsula Vatnsnes, the gorge Kolugljúfur is long over a kilometer deep and 40 to 60 meters. The river plunges into a groove and forms two magnificent waterfalls called Kolufossar. The ravine formed by the groove is large, and caution is required for all visiting the area.


8 Most dangerous sites in Iceland. Tips to stay safe in Iceland!

Krísuvíkurbjarg

Krísuvíkurbjarg is a gigantic rock that seems to rise from the sea, near Grindavík on the Reykjanes Peninsula. In summer, thousands of birds find refuge there. Although the road is not smooth to get there, and can be blocked by snow in winter, it is a magical place that offers stunning views of the sea and the Icelandic coast. It is recommended not to get too close to the edge, and admire the view a little further away.


8 Most dangerous sites in Iceland. Tips to stay safe in Iceland!

Látrabjarg

Látrabjarg, the most western point of Iceland, is a line of rocks which extend fourteen kilometers long and 441 meters high. Located on Highway 612, Látrabjarg is known to house thousands of birds during the summer time. The ground there can be rather difficult to walk on in parts, and we must be careful not to fall from the rocks when you contemplate the birds and the surrounding area.


8 Most dangerous sites in Iceland. Tips to stay safe in Iceland!

Namaskard / Leirhnjúkur

This volcanic mountain near Myvatn includes a geothermal site, named Hverir. Hverir is a place of steaming fumaroles, bubbling mud pots and lots of beautiful colours! Observe the barriers, and stick to the marked paths because the temperatures of these mud baths are among the highest in Iceland.

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Wednesday, 24 May 2017

When do mountain roads open? - F-Roads in Iceland

Iceland is such a beautiful country full of hidden pearls and quite perfect to go around by car. You can discover beautiful villages, the burning and remote areas of the north and the icy and cold glaciers of the southeast. But not all of these places are easy to get to, some of them are only reachable by mountain roads that have certain opening schedules, so you may be asking yourself When do mountain roads open?

When do mountain roads open? - Travel to Iceland

It is important to know what a mountain road is and where they are located. Iceland is divided into several different regions, one of them is known as hálendið or “The Highlands”. This area covers most of the island’s interior and it is full of glaciers, rugged mountains and hot springs surrounded by crazy rock formations. It is situated at 400-500 meters above the sea level and it is basically a volcanic inhabited area.

Roads crossing this area are known as “mountain roads”. You can differentiate them from other roads by their name “F-roads”. Any sign showing an F + number would be a mountain road. ex. F735. To drive through an F-road, a 4x4 vehicle is required. Sometimes even having a 4x4 is not enough, an experienced driver and a local expert is more than advisable as well, as some of these roads require river fording and risky driving. That is why asking When do mountain roads open? is important as conditions may affect your driving experience.

When do mountain roads open? - Travel to Iceland

When do mountain roads open?

In this article we are providing information on approximate opening dates of F-roads in the Highlands. Have a look at the table above (source: road.is), which collects the opening dates of the previous years.

On what factors does their opening depend?

F-roads can be crossed only during the Icelandic summer season, which in the Highlands it only lasts one month. The climate in this area is very unstable and it is changing constantly, snow usually covers these roads until the very begging of the summer. Answering the question of When do mountain roads open? is not as easy as it may seems as opening times highly depends on whether conditions that vary greatly from year to year.

When do mountain roads open? - Travel to Iceland

The fact that the Icelandic Public Roads administration has authorized the opening of an F-road; it does not mean that it is now as easy to drive as any non f-road. After ice melting, the surface may remain wet and slippery and caution is still required. Some roads will not be opened at all if the traffic in the area is not secure and the weather conditions do not allow it.

For those who are renting a vehicle, it is important to check with your rental company if their vehicles are allowed to go through F-roads. Bear in mind not many insurances companies cover damages for getting the underside of the vehicle wet due to river crossing or any other “hazardous” driving behaviors. To avoid any unpleasant situation, we recommend you in this When do mountain roads open? article to always read through the Terms and conditions of your rental agreement.

When do mountain roads open? - Travel to Iceland

How do I know which mountain roads are open? Keep yourself updated!

Do not underestimate nature forces, please be wary and always check the road and weather conditions before starting getting on your way. You can do so by checking:

http://www.road.is
http://en.vedur.is/

If you want to enjoy the wildest side of nature of Iceland please remember, it is better to be safe than sorry!

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Tuesday, 23 May 2017

Trip Report between Reykjavik and Akureyri. Iceland on the road!

This is the Part Two of the trip. Don't miss the Part One! Click here.

From Hvammstangi, you can go around the peninsula Vatnsnes and visit the beautiful Hvitserkur rocks; we recommend you stay the night!

Trip Report between Reykjavik and Akureyri. Iceland on the road!

Now you have gone two-thirds of the way between the Icelandic capital Reykjavík and Akureyri. Blönduós is on your way along road number one. Blönduós is a small town in the Bay of Húnaflói that lives mainly from agriculture, the fishing industry, and tourism. There you will find all the services you need - shops, a hospital, a sports and cultural center, a swimming pool, a camping site, a hotel, cafes and restaurants and even a golf course. Travelers can also discover a craft museum, a textile museum and an exhibition that will teach you everything about Arctic ice and glaciers

Trip Report between Reykjavik and Akureyri. Iceland on the road!

The city itself is near the glacial river, Bland originating from the glacier Hofsjökull and you can take a trip to the Bay of Húnaflói. Overlooking the town, you can also see the amazing architecture of the Church in Blönduós, which resembles a volcano crater. The church, designed by Maggi Jónsson, is open daily for tours, from mid-June to mid-August.

Blönduós and its surrounding area are fantastic for anglers since they have the best rivers for trout and salmon fishing. We advise you to get the proper information about what type of fishing permit you require in Blönduós because for some rich, popular rivers; the prices are astronomical. See this website for more information.

Trip Report between Reykjavik and Akureyri. Iceland on the road!

About twenty kilometers from Blönduós on Route 715 in the Víðidalur Valley is the Kolugljúfur canyon and the waterfall Kolufoss that accompanies it. In such a beautiful area, we recommend to enjoy the best view, stand on the bridge that crosses the river Víðidalsá. This river is rich in salmon and attracts anglers from around the world.

Trip Report between Reykjavik and Akureyri. Iceland on the road!

Further along, the road number one is the city of Kolugljúfur in the fjord Skagafjörður, a frequent stop for those who want a bite to eat or to stretch their legs. Kolugljúfur is the last town before Akureyri, and you will find some particular shops, a petrol station, a post office, and of course a public swimming pool. If you want to take a walk, the way to the highest point of the hill Reykjarhóll is fun, and it's one of the few times trees will surround you in Iceland. The tourist office will direct you if you want to go sightseeing in the area, and activities are numerous from hiking to horseback riding. The region is known for rafting, and central Bakkaflöt further in the valley, will delight the young and the old; you can also spend the night.

Trip Report between Reykjavik and Akureyri. Iceland on the road!

Soon you will meet the neck of Öxnadalsheiði (take caution when traveling there in winter). Half an hour before arriving at Akureyri, stop by the pleasantly warm bath at Þelamörk. A little over 400 kilometers have led you to the northern capital of Akureyri, where many surprises await you.

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Thursday, 18 May 2017

Top 5 guided tours in Reykjavik - What to do in Reykjavik

There are dozens of guided walks in Reykjavik. Even though it is easy to explore the city on your own, a walk with a local guide can be a great experience! Here are some of our favourite walks.

Top 5 guided tours in Reykjavik - What to do in Reykjavik

Reykjavik Music Walk

The "Reykjavik Music" promenade is a guided tour that will help you (re) discover the pop and rock scene of the Icelandic capital; during the hour and a half tour, you will be taken to venues where Icelandic musicians like to play or meet. The visit is led by the Icelandic journalist and specialist Arnar Eggert Thoroddsen. It commences at 11:30 am on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays (or only on Wednesdays in winter) at the Harpa Convention Centre and Music Hall. The tour is free, but tips are appreciated.

More information here.

Top 5 guided tours in Reykjavik - What to do in Reykjavik

Haunted Reykjavik

This one-and-a-half-hour spooky tour will take you to Reykjavik’s most famous haunted sites, where you will learn about Icelandic folklore and the ghosts that can be found in the Icelandic capital. Historian Óli Kári Ólason will guide you on this tour that covers around 2.5 kilometres. The tour is only available from June to September and you can find your guide at 8 pm every day (except on Friday) in front of "Restaurant Reykjavik", opposite the tourist office on the corner of Aðalstræti and Vesturgata.

You can have some more info here.

Top 5 guided tours in Reykjavik - What to do in Reykjavik

City sightseeing running tour

If you would like to do some sightseeing, whilst also keeping fit, you can take part in a city running tour with a guide. The tour takes place every Friday morning at 8 am (weather permitting) and lasts for an hour or an hour and a half. You will discover the most interesting and scenic places of the Icelandic capital. Your guide will also give you tips on places to visit, restaurants to try and shops not to be missed! Hotel pick-ups can be arranged.

Click for more info here.

Top 5 guided tours in Reykjavik - What to do in Reykjavik

I heart RKV tour

Audur's blog, I ♥ RKV, is a great source for anyone looking for information about the capital, or Iceland in general. You can find unique and interesting tours and activities on the websites, led by very enthusiastic guides that aim to make you love their home city and country, as much as they do.

More info here.

Top 5 guided tours in Reykjavik - What to do in Reykjavik

City walk & Walk the Crash

The famous two-hour walking tour focuses on the history of Iceland, the evolution of Reykjavik as a town and Icelandic culture in general, laid out in an informative and comic way by English speaking Icelanders with history majors. This tour has no fixed price, instead it runs on the great Free Walking Tour model, where the participant decides what to pay at the end of the tour.

Top 5 guided tours in Reykjavik - What to do in Reykjavik

Th financial history tour takes you through the causes and consequences of the collapse of the banking system in 2008. Magnús, an economic historian and expert in Icelandic financial history, will show you some of the sights of the “financial miracle” of Iceland and the bank crash of 2008-9. Learn how and why Reykjavik aspired to become a global financial centre, why the banks collapsed and why Iceland put bankers behind bars! This tours costs 3500ISK and runs 1-2 times per week during winter, private tours can also be requested.

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Tuesday, 16 May 2017

7 Social rules for your visit to Iceland

On entering a person's home in Iceland, you must always remove your shoes and leave them in the hallway. This rule applies to some public buildings i.e. medical centres, hospitals, schools; most will provide blue plastic shoe covers on entering the building. This respectable habit links to the weather; leaving your shoes on inside the house means you put snow and mud/sand in the house. There is one exception, and that is when you are wearing fancy shoes to a house party, the host may allow you to leave your shoes on - always ask first to make sure!

7 Social rules for your visit to Iceland

In Iceland people always shower naked with soap at the local swimming pool before entering the pool area. Icelanders are quite strict about personal hygiene and so taking a shower without swimwear is quite natural and commonplace at pools in Iceland. The men and women's shower rooms are separate, and for anyone feeling uncomfortable about getting naked in a public place, there is usually a shower with a curtain in most pools.

7 Social rules for your visit to Iceland

When meeting and greeting people for the first time in Iceland, shake their hand and address them by their first name. Icelanders use their father's first name as their surname and so for example, if you encounter Ragnar Þórsson (son of Ragnar Þór) do not address him using "Mr Þórsson," just say "Ragnar" even if Ragnar is a priest, a teacher or a doctor.

At the end of a meal or snack in an Icelandic person home, it is customary to thank the host saying "takk fyrir mig" (literally, "thank you for me"). If you meet that person the next day or a few days later, it is polite to thank them again saying "takk fyrir siðast" (literally meaning "thank you for the last time").

7 Social rules for your visit to Iceland

Iceland is an egalitarian and individualistic society, and ethics and unwritten rules between the sexes are not the same as in other parts of Europe, for example, do not expect a man to hold the door open for you ladies, or to pay the whole bill at a restaurant after a romantic evening out.

Icelanders are a nation of workers, and they appreciate conversations with visitors around work and occupation. There could be a possible misunderstanding if you speak positively about your unemployed status or early retirement. As for most Icelanders, they wish to work for as many years as they can in the hope of exceeding retirement age.

7 Social rules for your visit to Iceland

The family is very important in Iceland, and having children young is not a problem neither is changing partners during your lifetime. Stepfamilies are common and accepted in Icelandic society, with the whole extended family working well together and treating the stepchildren as their own. It’s rare that an Icelandic woman has her first child after 30 years of age. If you are a man or woman, and you don’t wish to have children, it will come as a surprise to your Icelandic contacts and friends.

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Sunday, 14 May 2017

What to do between Reykjavík and Akureyri? Travel Guide

Just a twenty minutes drive from Reykjavik city center; Mosfellsbær is a charming little town that offers beautiful walks and hikes. Mosfellsbær is also the place where the group Sigur Rós have their famous recording studio, Sundlaugin; an old swimming pool that the band converted into a studio in 1999. Since 2008, the studio is open to all those musicians who wish to record music album.

What to do between Reykjavík and Akureyri? Travel Guide

When in Mosfellsbær you can also visit Gljúfrasteinn, the home of writer Halldór Laxness; who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1955, his work has been published in over 43 languages. The house is still the same since the Laxness family lived there. In summer, tours take place from 9:00 to 5:00 p.m., then 10:00 to 4:00 p.m during the week in winter. . However, if you travel in a group, you can arrange a visit by appointment. A visit to Gljúfrasteinn costs 800Kr.

Just after Mosfellsbær is Mount Esja (you’ve probably seen it from Harpa, Reykjavik) is a chain of popular mountains for hikers and climbers. There are several marked hiking trails; the best-known trails are Þverfellshorn and Kerhólakambur leading you up the mountain 780 and 851 meters high.

What to do between Reykjavík and Akureyri? Travel Guide

Continuing on your way to the northwest, you can make a detour of several kilometers and see the town of Akranes, home to 6650 people. The cultural centre and museum Garðar are well-worth a visit if you are interested in the Icelandic way of life from the nineteenth and twentieth century. If you prefer more leisure activities, or you have children with you, a trip to the pool Jaðarsbakki or to the Garðalundur recreational park will be enjoyed by everyone. Akranes is famous for its two lighthouses that can be seen near the port; very impressive viewing points especially for photographers, and it is possible to visit a photography exhibition at the largest lighthouse.

What to do between Reykjavík and Akureyri? Travel Guide

Located 75 kilometers from Reykjavik, Borgarnes has 2,000 inhabitants and offers many activities for those who visit, especially in the summer season. For a delicious and hearty breakfast try out the bakery Geirabakarí. For some exercise, you can walk in the Skallagrímsgarður Park, go hiking in Einkunnir or climb the mountain Hafnarfjall. You can also visit the bird exhibition and see photography at the Borgarfjörður museum or go for a swim or relax in the hotpot at the public Borgarnes swimming pool. If you wish to occupy younger children in a fun way, you can visit the Bjössaróló playground or visit the puppets centre Brúðuheimar. The Borgarnes colonization museum offers two permanent exhibitions: based on two books, one on the saga of Egill, "The Icelandic Book" and the other on colonization, "The Book of colonization."

What to do between Reykjavík and Akureyri? Travel Guide

Following on further north, just after Bifröst at the edge of the number one road, you will find a small car park that will take you to the Grabrok crater; the walk to the crater takes less than half an hour and when you get there you can enjoy the magnificent view of the surrounding landscape. Further along, a detour of several kilometers takes you into the village Hvammstangi. 580 people live there today, living mainly from fishing and tourism; visit the local museum to learn more about the history of Hvammstangi. Hvammstangi is best known for hosting the largest textile factory in Iceland, Kidka, and is also renowned for the seals that often run along its coastline. You can visit the seal museum that provides in-depth information about this mammal, or you can take a seal watching boat trip.

To be continued in Part II...

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Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Icelandic volcanoes - Visit the famous volcanoes in Iceland!

Many people around the globe got to hear more about Iceland in the media, after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, which disrupted air traffic in Europe for several days in the spring of 2010. Iceland is a country with a turbulent geological and volcanic history. Visit a few volcano sites where Icelandic volcanoes tell their story.

Icelandic volcanoes - Visit the famous volcanoes in Iceland!

Hekla is probably the best known and most active volcano in Iceland. Located in the north-east of the small town Hella in South Iceland, it has erupted about every ten years since 1970, with its last eruption in 2000. Hekla hasn't had any eruptions in 15 years but is still showing signs of volcanic activity; the local newspapers often report on Hekla´s tremors. Note that many travel companies offer day trips to walk to the summit of the volcano.

Icelandic volcanoes - Visit the famous volcanoes in Iceland!

The last eruption of the volcano Katla located north of Vik, dates back to 1918, although it is possible that small eruptions occurred since without breaking the ice on the top of the volcano. Katla is a dreaded volcano that gives off violent and enormous lava flow.

Located under the Mýrdalsjökull glacier, it is possible to make small hikes on the glacier, with a professional guide. Elgjá, near Katla, is a volcano and a canyon known and appreciated by travellers and hikers. The canyon is home to the cascade of Ófærufoss, that delights lovers of Icelandic nature. East of Krafla, the Theistareykjarbunga volcano is inactive for more than 2000 years.


Icelandic volcanoes - Visit the famous volcanoes in Iceland!

Askja is a popular destination for travellers; it’s a set of calderas that most recently erupted in 1961. Askja is known best for one of its calderas, Öskuvatn, and its Víti crater, in which it is possible to swim in water that is 20 60 ° C depending on the time of year. The road to Askja in the highlands only opens during the summer time; the road is only accessible while driving a 4x4 and the journey may seem long and tiresome. If you decide to get there without going through a tourism company, make sure that you are sufficiently informed and equipped for the journey. An alternative would be to use professional guides at the local tourist offices in the region, such as the team Visit Askja.

Krafla is a caldera about 10 km in diameter, located in the Myvatn area in northern Iceland. Between the years of 1724 to 1729, the cracks of the caldera were opened, and a large amount of lava flowed towards the village of Reykjahlíð, destroying the village and three farms in its path. The story goes that the lava stopped just before the church after the parish priest said prayers. Between the years 1975 to 1984, a new magma chamber was formed after repeated volcanic eruptions occurred in Krafla.

Icelandic volcanoes - Visit the famous volcanoes in Iceland!

Bárðarbunga volcano underneath Vatnajokull glacier became well-known to travellers during its eruption in 2014-2015. This recent eruption lasted more than six months since it started on August 29th, 2014 and ended on February 27, 2015. It took place north-east of the caldera Bárðarbunga in the lava field Holuhraun. It attracted thousands of visitors to Iceland, who flew over the eruption or went there illegally by all-terrain vehicles. Landmannalaugar Tours and Visit Askja offers guided tours to the eruption site.

Icelandic volcanoes - Visit the famous volcanoes in Iceland!

Check out the second part of the article here!

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Monday, 8 May 2017

Game of Thrones, Interstellar,... Movies filmed in Iceland!

Over the past decade, Iceland has become a popular destination, not only for tourists, but also for filmmakers, who come from all over the world to film here.


Game of Thrones, Interstellar,... Movies filmed in Iceland!

Iceland is a haven for filmmakers, with its majestic waterfalls, imposing glaciers, lava fields, sulphurous mountains, lakes and lagoons of blue water. The spectacular scenery is not the only attraction for filming here: the Icelandic government also offers generous tax incentives to encourage more filming on the island.

Before the 2000s, there were just a few internationally known films shot in Iceland. However, in 2005, a scene from the movie Batman Begins (2005), that was filmed on the Svínafellsjökull glacier, caught the attention of filmmakers.

Game of Thrones, Interstellar,... Movies filmed in Iceland!

Some movies that have scenes shot in Iceland include 2 James Bond films (1985 and 2002), Interstellar, Star Trek Into Darkness, Star Wars: The Force Awakens and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. There are many others ... You can easily recognize the waterfall Dettifoss in the opening scene of Ridley Scott’s Prometheus (2012), and some familiar landscapes in Darren Aronofsky’s Noah (2014) -Russell Crowe, the main actor in the film, is a regular visitor to Iceland. A scene from the American film, Hostel: Part II, was shot at the blue lagoon.

Game of Thrones, Interstellar,... Movies filmed in Iceland!

In March 2016, the film crew from the Fast & Furious 8 made quite a stir when a car drove into the frozen Lake Myvatn and a horse named Jupiter was killed near the set after a fake iceberg being used for filming was blown by gale force winds into its paddock.

Iceland also gained exposure on TV programme such as Sense8, Fortitude and Game Of Thrones. Visitors from all over the world now travel to Iceland to enjoy the "Game of Thrones Tour", which takes them to areas that were used in the series such as Mývatn and the hot spring Grjótagjá.

Game of Thrones, Interstellar,... Movies filmed in Iceland!

The above map was made by Film in Iceland; It shows all the main foreign movies which have filmed one or more scenes in Iceland, and tells you in which region they are in.

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